The strips on this plate were cut with a wedge shape, which gives the stripes a curve near the rim. I’m going to have to try it again with a steeper angle.

atthebeachtoday said: I use epoxy with coffee grinds to fill holes and cracks.

I’ve done that too. A friend gave me a lunchbox full of jars of various powdered pigments so I’ve been experimenting with them.

Filled a loose knot with epoxy mixed with white pigment, which more than a couple of people told me they didn’t like.

From scraps, including some bird’s-eye maple that was a rejected floorboard from our shop rebuild (because someone spilled coffee on it).

I got a 18% gray card to properly set the white balance on my camera, and I must say that my photos have improved considerably.

These table numbers are soon to be re-used for my sister-in-law’s wedding. I made a new number one out of mulberry.

This bowl was returned to me after I offered to repair a split. I was afraid it was a joint along one of the paduak strips with the grain running diagonally, but instead was this weird mulberry that cracked near the edge from internal stresses. The piece that cracked is in the middle, with a small knot. The repair turned out well—you wouldn’t notice it if you didn’t know to look for it, but in the lower left of the first photo you might be able to see the slight wave in the edge that remains. I hope enough stress was relieved that my epoxy will hold. I gave the recipient another small bowl as an apology.

You can really see how the colors darken from UV light by comparing the front and back.

I also found a photo from this one was in progress. While I had this bowl up on the lathe, and while I was taking a break for lunch, an unescorted visitor to our shop decided he’d try his hand a little woodturning! Luckily, he had the scraper upside-down and so couldn’t do much damage.

The cousin to this bowl, from the same wood of forgotten origin.

Valentine’s Day 2014.


Valentine’s Day 2014.

Q-tip holder.

A small Christmas gift. I think this is silver maple. The “natural edge” is actually the weathered face from when this hunk sat out in a woodpile. Trying out tung oil for the first time. I like the glossiness except for the plastic look it gives the edge.

End-cut cherry laser-etched X-mas ornaments. Snowflakes, reindeer, A Charlie Brown Christmas, and the Abominable Snowman.

End-cut cherry laser-etched X-mas ornaments. Snowflakes, reindeer, A Charlie Brown Christmas, and the Abominable Snowman.

Maple butcherblock with maple inset, and two shots of my September production side by side.

Maple bowl with padauk inset.

Tea light holder. I made this back in May from the remains of my blown-up bowl.
I’ve been waiting for a working spray booth to put a finish on this. Our shop went through a complete remodeling this summer. I’m finally back in business.

Tea light holder. I made this back in May from the remains of my blown-up bowl.

I’ve been waiting for a working spray booth to put a finish on this. Our shop went through a complete remodeling this summer. I’m finally back in business.

frederickmas said: I saw your thanksgiving turkey hand project and wondered how is it done? Are they veneers or do you make different bowls and glue them together? Thanks

Take two boards stacked on top of each other, cut the pattern out of both at once on a scroll saw, then reverse the cutouts and glue them together restacked. The piece of cedar wasn’t wide enough, so I edge-jointed it to a scrap of walnut first, which adds another layer of complexity.